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Report | Environment Rhode Island Research and Policy Center

A Record of Leadership: How Northeastern States are Cutting Global Warming Pollution and Building a Clean Economy

Over the last decade, northeastern states have built a track record of successful action to reduce global warming pollution. By working together across state lines and partisan divides—and developing innovative new policies to hasten the transition to a clean energy economy—the Northeast has succeeded in cutting emissions while safeguarding the region’s economic health.

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News Release | Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center

Clean Cars would Slash Oil Use and Pollution this Summer

As Rhode Islanders get ready for summer road trips, an Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center report finds that cleaner, more fuel efficient cars would significantly slash oil consumption and global warming pollution across the state. The report, Summer on the Road: Going Farther on a Gallon of Gas, was released as the Obama administration is on the verge of finalizing fuel efficiency and global warming pollution standards for cars and light trucks that achieve a 54.5 mpg standard by 2025.

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Report | Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center

Summer on the Road

As Rhode Islanders get ready to hit the road this Memorial Day weekend for first-of-the-summer-road trips, a new Environment Rhode Island Research and Policy Center report finds that cleaner, more fuel efficient cars would cut our gasoline use in half, reducing pollution and saving Rhode Islanders money.

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RI waterways among country's cleanest

A new report has ranked Rhode Island's waterways as among the cleanest in the United States.

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Report ranks RI waterways among cleanest in US

The report released by Environment Rhode Island Research and Policy Group says Rhode Island was behind only Arizona in the amount of toxic chemicals released into its waterways. The state released less than 1,000 pounds of toxic material in 2010.

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