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Report | Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center

Summer on the Road

As Rhode Islanders get ready to hit the road this Memorial Day weekend for first-of-the-summer-road trips, a new Environment Rhode Island Research and Policy Center report finds that cleaner, more fuel efficient cars would cut our gasoline use in half, reducing pollution and saving Rhode Islanders money.

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RI waterways among country's cleanest

A new report has ranked Rhode Island's waterways as among the cleanest in the United States.

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Report ranks RI waterways among cleanest in US

The report released by Environment Rhode Island Research and Policy Group says Rhode Island was behind only Arizona in the amount of toxic chemicals released into its waterways. The state released less than 1,000 pounds of toxic material in 2010.

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Report | Environment Rhode Island

Wasting Our Waterways 2012

Industrial facilities continue to dump millions of pounds of toxic chemicals into America’s rivers, streams, lakes and ocean waters each year – threatening both the environment and human health. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), pollution from industrial facilities is responsible for threatening or fouling water quality in more than 14,000 miles of rivers and more than 220,000 acres of lakes, ponds and estuaries nationwide. However, Rhode Island's waterways are ranked second cleanest in the nation by total volume of discharged toxics.

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News Release | Environment Rhode Island

Obama Administration to Protect Americans’ Health by Setting Carbon Pollution Standards for New Power Plants

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed historic new limits on carbon pollution from new power plants. Carbon pollution fuels global warming, which scientists predict will lead to more devastating floods, more deadly heat waves, and the spread of infectious diseases. There are currently no federal limits on carbon pollution from power plants, yet coal-fired power plants are the largest single source of carbon pollution in the United States. The standard proposed today will correct that for new power plants by limiting their emissions of carbon pollution.

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