Reports

Report | Environment Rhode Island Research and Policy Center

When it Rains, it Pours

Global warming is happening now and its effects are being felt in the United States and around the world. Among the expected consequences of global warming is an increase in the heaviest rain and snow storms, fueled by increased evaporation and the ability of a warmer atmosphere to hold more moisture.

Report | Environment Rhode Island Research and Policy Center

A Record of Leadership: How Northeastern States are Cutting Global Warming Pollution and Building a Clean Economy

Over the last decade, northeastern states have built a track record of successful action to reduce global warming pollution. By working together across state lines and partisan divides—and developing innovative new policies to hasten the transition to a clean energy economy—the Northeast has succeeded in cutting emissions while safeguarding the region’s economic health.

Report | Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center

Summer on the Road

As Rhode Islanders get ready to hit the road this Memorial Day weekend for first-of-the-summer-road trips, a new Environment Rhode Island Research and Policy Center report finds that cleaner, more fuel efficient cars would cut our gasoline use in half, reducing pollution and saving Rhode Islanders money.

Report | Environment Rhode Island

Wasting Our Waterways 2012

Industrial facilities continue to dump millions of pounds of toxic chemicals into America’s rivers, streams, lakes and ocean waters each year – threatening both the environment and human health. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), pollution from industrial facilities is responsible for threatening or fouling water quality in more than 14,000 miles of rivers and more than 220,000 acres of lakes, ponds and estuaries nationwide. However, Rhode Island's waterways are ranked second cleanest in the nation by total volume of discharged toxics.

Report | Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center, RIPIRG Education Fund

Too Close to Home

The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster delivered a reminder to the world that nuclear power comes with inherent risks. Among the risks demonstrated by the Fukushima crisis is the threat of water contamination, including contamination of drinking water supplies by radioactive material. In the United States, 49 million Americans receive their drinking water from surface sources located within 50 miles of an active nuclear power plant—inside the boundary the Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses to assess risk to food and water supplies.

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